Birth Control

Can you get pregnant when you’re on your period?

Yes, your body can ovulate (release an egg) at any time during your cycle, even when you’re having your period.  To protect yourself from becoming pregnant, it’s best to use birth control and condoms every time you have sex.

If I started using nuvaring yesterday on the first day of my period, how soon can I have unprotected sex? Will nuvaring be effective the first-fifth day while having my period?

The NuvaRing is a painless, easy-to-use birth control method that is 98-99% effective at preventing pregnancy.

If you start using the NuvaRing on the first day of your menstrual cycle, it will work immediately– including during your period.

(If a person starts any other time in your cycle, you will need to use an extra method of birth control, such as condoms, for seven days in order to give the hormones in the ring time to build up to full strength in your body.)

Remember, like all hormonal birth control methods, the NuvaRing does not protect against STDs. You’ll need to use condoms for that.

All of Maine’s family planning health centers offer the NuvaRing on a sliding fee scale. Contact your local family planning clinic to learn more.

 

how can a 14 year old girl get pregnant with a 14 year old guy?

pregnancy happens when a sperm cell (from a guy) meets an egg cell (from a girl). pregnancy usually happens through sexual intercourse (or “vaginal” intercourse). once people have gone through puberty, pregnancy can happen no matter the ages of the people having sex.

using a condom and/or being on birth control greatly reduces the risk of becoming pregnant.

Is there any way that I can get on birth control for free, without my parents finding out? I’m 14.

We always encourage young people to talk with a parent or another adult that they trust about big personal decisions, like becoming sexually active and/or using birth control. It’s nice to have someone in your life that you can talk to about these things, but not everyone is going to be comfortable talking to their parents.

That said, all of the services at Maine Family Planning clinics, including birth control, are confidential. That means that we won’t tell anyone about your visit, and you don’t need permission from your parents (or anyone else) to come to a family planning clinic.

The cost of birth control depends on your income and family size, but we’ll do our best to find an affordable option that works for you. You’ll want to call your local clinic to find out exactly what you can expect to pay.

Not every doctor’s office has to follow the same rules when it comes to confidentiality and cost, though, so if you go somewhere other than one of the clinics listed on our site, you’d want to talk with them about how they handle privacy, confidentiality, and cost.

Either way, using birth control if you are sexually active is a very responsible decision! You can make that decision for yourself and keep it private, if you choose.

Why hasn’t anyone made a birth control for guys that maybe makes it so the sperm is unfurl or something?

That’s a really good question! There are several reasons that there are more female-controlled birth control options than options for guys. Some people say it has to do with hormones, others with trust and the consequences of birth control failure. There ARE scientists working on male-controlled birth control options, though. We’ll be sure to keep paying attention to that!

It’s worth reminding everyone that men CAN use birth control– when used correctly, condoms are up to 97% effective at preventing pregnancy. Bonus: they help protect against STDs, too!

For men who are done having children (or don’t want any at all), vasectomy is an option, as well– though it’s permanent, so it’s definitely not a solution for everyone.

what are the best options to prevent pregnancy without using condom or contraceptive pills ?

The most effective options to prevent pregnancy are what we call Long Acting Reversible Contraceptives, or LARCs. These methods include IUDs and the Implant, both of which are over 99% effective. IUDs are effective anywhere from 3 – 12 years (depending on the kind of IUD), and the Implant is effective for 3 years. A medical provider inserts the method and then you don’t have to remember to take a pill or anything– both methods can be removed by a medical provider at any time.

Abstinence or “not right now” is also an option for preventing pregnancy. If you practice abstinence 100% of the time, it will be 100% effective– though it requires willpower. It’s a good idea to have a back-up plan (like condoms and/or Emergency Contraception) if abstinence is your birth control of choice.

Other methods such as the shot, ring, and patch can also be very effective. They require a little more maintenance than an IUD or Implant– you’ll have to think about them once a week (patch), once a month (ring), or every three months (shot)–but that is still easier for some people than taking a pill every day.

Keep in mind that none of these methods protect against STDs, so unless you and your partner have both been tested (and treated, if necessary), using condoms to prevent STDs is still important.

What is the legal age for a woman to receive birth control? What are the regulations for abortions in Maine for underage girls? Is parental consent needed for girls under the age of 18 to get birth control or abortions?

Let’s take these one at a time.

What is the legal age for a woman to receive birth control?

Health providers can begin prescribing birth control as soon as a girl or woman is medically eligible– meaning that she’s safely started her period. There’s no “legal” or official age, as girls go through puberty and start their periods at different ages.

What are the regulations for abortions in Maine for underage girls?

We’re not sure what you mean when you say “regulations–” here are some of the laws and practices around abortion in Maine:

  • All abortion providers in Maine are licensed by the Maine Board of Medicine.
  • All patients, regardless of age, go through in-depth counseling and an informed consent process.
  • Patients  under 18 are required to involve an adult in their decision, but they do not need to notify or get consent from a parent to get an abortion.
  • Currently, both Federal and Maine state law ban the use of Medicare and Medicaid/ MaineCare funds from covering an abortion (except in very limited cases)– which means that even if a person has insurance through Medicaid or Medicare, they will have to pay for the procedure out of pocket.

Is parental consent needed for girls under the age of 18 to get birth control or abortions?

What if a man accidentally swallowed morning after pill?

If a male were to take just one morning after pill (also called emergency contraception), the chances of anything at all happening would be very slim– possibly  just some nausea or a headache. This pill is similar to birth control pills and contain a relatively low dose of hormones, and because it’s just one dose, wouldn’t have long-term effects.

Hormonal medications can be complicated and do come with risks, and hormonal medications shouldn’t be taken long-term by anyone without talking to a medical provider first.

i took some female contraception pill what would that mean if i took them every day for the next 30 days?

It depends on whether you were born with biologically male or female anatomy.

If you were born with female anatomy (you have a uterus and ovaries), taking birth control every day for 30 days would be a way to prevent pregnancy. Some side effects could include tender breasts, headaches, and changes in your period.

If you were born with male anatomy (you have a penis and testicles), taking birth control pills every day for 30 days would probably not do a lot, but there could be some slight effects. While your body is still making “male” hormones (testosterone and androgen), the small amount of hormone in the pills probably wouldn’t have a big effect. Over enough time (probably longer than 30 days), taking birth control pills could lead to some increase in fat around the hips and chest/ breasts.

If a person wants to take a hormonal medication–to transition, for birth control, or for any other reason–they MUST see a medical provider to make sure that they are taking the right medications in the right dose, because hormones can have serious risks and side effects.

If you think are a transgender teen, we recommend that you connect with a good support person/network. Do you have a trusted adult you can talk with about your gender identity? If not, is there a local LGBTQ youth group in your area? A really good place to start is Maine TransNet, which offers information on local support groups and other resources; they can even connect you with a counselor who you can talk with. If you’re 18 or over, you can call Lewiston Family Planning to talk about hormonal transition.

I have a question and I’m really concerned, I’ve been on a birth control called nexplanon that last 3 years, I was supposed to get it removed July 25th I had unprotected sex on my removal date July 25th, thinking I was supposed to have it removed on the July 26th, I was wrong. I’m anxious, and nervous, is it a possibility that I could be pregnant.

Your risk of pregnancy is very low. Nexplanon is one of the most effective forms of birth control available with a less than 1% failure rate (this means that fewer than 1 in 100 women per year will get pregnant while using Nexplanon– no method is failure-proof).

Nexplanon is recommended for three years (though it can be removed earlier), but some studies have shown that it can be effective at preventing pregnancy up to four years. Going “over” by a day or two should not increase your risk significantly.

If you’re worried about pregnancy, the best thing to do is to take a pregnancy test at home or at a Maine Family Planning clinic. If you haven’t already gotten a new Nexplanon or started a new method of birth control, now is a good time to talk to a provider about what would work best for you.

how does a birth control pill stop you from becoming pregnant?

The birth control pill (or “oral contraceptive pill”) is a hormonal medicine that is taken once a day. The pill prevents pregnancy by releasing hormones that keep the ovaries from releasing eggs. The hormones also thicken the cervical mucus, which helps to block sperm from getting to the egg in the first place. If sperm can’t get to an egg (either because it was never released or because it can’t get through the cervix), pregnancy can’t happen.

I want to be on birth control but I don’t want my mom to know because I’m not having sex, I just want to be safe you know just in case anything happened what do I do? And is there anyway I can get it legally @ age 15 without my mom knowing?

Many people use birth control even if they aren’t sexually active, for a number of reasons. It’s good that you’re being responsible and planning for your own health and future– whatever your reasons are, they are legitimate!

Teens in Maine can get birth control and other reproductive health services (like STD testing or annual exams) without having to tell their parents or get their parents’ permission. The law protects your confidentiality and your right to make decisions about your own reproductive health. Call a Family Planning clinic near you to make an appointment and be sure to discuss confidentiality with them.

We always encourage young people to talk to an adult they trust about sex, relationships, and other big decisions, but we understand that parents aren’t always the ones you can turn to. We hope there’s an adult in your life you can trust!

how can I tell if my nuvaring is still inside of me?

The best way to check is to use your fingers to find the NuvaRing (the same way you would insert or remove the ring). After washing your hands, insert a finger into your vagina and feel for the ring. If you’re having trouble, do your best to relax your muscles and try different positions (you could try crouching or laying down).

The NuvaRing can NOT be pushed too far up in the vagina or get lost inside you, because the cervix (the lower end of the uterus) will block it from going any farther. The NuvaRing can accidentally slip out of the vagina while removing a tampon, during sex, or straining when going to the bathroom, though– so it is important to check to make sure the ring is still there.

If you can’t find your NuvaRing because it’s fallen out, contact your doctor or local Maine Family Planning clinic. You’ll need a new one in order to be protected from pregnancy.

should my boyfriend use contraceptive pills?

Probably not.

If you boyfriend is a cisgender man and wants to prevent getting anyone pregnant, taking contraceptive pills won’t work. The only effective birth control options for cisgender men (right now) are condoms and vasectomy/ sterilization.

If your boyfriend is “biologically” a man but is interested in transitioning using hormones (maybe identifies as transgender), contraceptive pills would not be a good option. The hormones aren’t strong enough for transition. It’s also very important that medical/ hormonal transition is done under the care of a medical professional. Lewiston Family Planning can help those 18 and over.

If your boyfriend is a transgender man and wants to take contraceptive pills to prevent pregnancy, he should talk to his health care provider. This could be a good option depending on his goals, what works for his body, and other medications he’s taking.

If you are using NuvaRing continuously without a week free break, once you put a new NuvaRing in are protected?

Yes. As long as you had your previous NuvaRing in for at least 7 days (1 week) and no more than 21 days (3 weeks), you will continue to be protected as soon as you put your new ring in (on the 22nd day).

 

Where can you get Depo Provera?

In Maine, you can get Depo Provera at any Maine Family Planning clinic or at any Planned Parenthood clinic. Services at these clinics are confidential, even if you’re a teen, and we work hard to make all birth control method affordable. You can find a list of MFP & PP clinics here. 

Many other doctor’s offices– such as primary care doctors and OB/GYNs– can also provide Depo Provera. They don’t always have to follow the same confidentiality rules as family planning clinics, but if you have a doctor you trust, you can ask them whether they can provide Depo Provera.

How likely is it to get pregnant the first day my depo shot is due? It was due today and me and my husband had unprotected sex but I cant get my shot till the 7th?? should I be worried?

The Depo Provera shot is over 99% effective at preventing pregnancy as long as the injection is given every 12 -13 weeks. Most practices will schedule your shot every 12 weeks, which gives you a one-week cushion in case things come up and you can’t make it to the clinic in exactly 12 weeks.

You should look at when you had your LAST shot. As long as the 7th/ your appointment is within 13 weeks since your last depo shot, it’s very unlikely that you could be pregnant.

If you’re worried, you could ask for a pregnancy test when you get her next shot. Family Planning clinics offer affordable, confidential pregnancy tests and depo shots at all locations: www.maineteenhealth.org/clinics

i’ve had unprotected sex multiple times and i’m scared that i might have gotten my girlfriend pregnant or i have STDs what do i do?

The only way for your girlfriend to know if she’s pregnant or for either of you to know if you have an STD is to get tested by a health care provider. Family planning clinics in Maine offer confidential, affordable pregnancy and STD testing, and if either test is positive, those clinics also offer counseling and/or STD treatment.

If you (and your girlfriend) go in for testing and the results are negative, a family planning provider can help you find the birth control that will work best for your girlfriend and STD protection that will work for the two of you as a couple– that way, you won’t have to worry so much about pregnancy or STDs in the future.

what happens when you get a vasectomy?

A vasectomy is a simple medical procedure in which the vas deferens is cut, tied, or otherwise blocked in order to ‘sterilize’ a person with a penis. This procedure prevents pregnancy by keeping sperm from being able to get out of the male body.

Vasectomy does not affect sexual performance. The only difference post-vasectomy is that the semen he ejaculates will no longer contain sperm.

Hi. 2 days ago I had sex and we used a condom. But it broke and we took it out straight away. is there any chance I could be pregnant? I’m not on the pill and I don’t have a bar.

If your partner ejaculated (came) before the condom broke, and you’re not on any type of birth control, there is a chance of pregnancy. Even if your partner did not ejaculate, there is still a slight risk of pregnancy from pre-cum (the small amount of fluid that comes out of the penis before orgasm/ ejaculation).

If you’re worried about getting pregnant but don’t want to be, your only option for preventing pregnancy after a few days is to take Emergency Contraception (EC). Plan B is an EC pill you can get (without a prescription) from drug stores or any Family Planning clinic; it’s effective up to 3 days after unprotected sex, but it’s more effective the sooner you take it. Ella is another type of EC pill, and it can be effective up to 5 days after unprotected sex. You do need a prescription for Ella, though, or you can pick it up at any Family Planning clinic. EC prevents pregnancy by keeping your body from releasing an egg– EC is not an abortion.

There’s definitely still a risk of transmitting STDs when a condom breaks (because of skin-to-skin contact, pre-cum, and/or any semen (cum) that might have been in the condom before it broke), so if you haven’t both been tested, you may want to schedule a confidential test with a Family Planning clinic.

 

Me and my girlfriend were humping. We both were wearing underwear and shorts both. I accidentally cum in my shorts. We are worried if this may cause pregnancy to her. The reason being even her shorts had a small spot of wetness from my shorts. After reading about similar cases online, I came to know that sperms can travel in wet and hot conditions. Her panty was also wet. Hence I feel that if the wet part on her shorts accidentally touched her panty, what would be the risk of pregnancy. Need urgent help. Also she was to take contraceptive pill, she has a ovarian cyst. I’m worried if it may increase the impact of the associated side effects like headache, nausea etc.

If both of you had clothes on the whole time (even if they were wet and the fabric is thin), there is very little chance of pregnancy. Sperm can not travel through clothing.

However, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) can travel through clothing, so if either of you have been sexually active in the past and haven’t been tested for STDs, it might be a good idea to get checked. If you and your girlfriend are fooling around or engage in any type of sexual activity in the future, it’s a good idea to use condoms— condoms help reduce the risk of STDs AND pregnancy.

It’s a great idea for your girlfriend to use some form of birth control so that you don’t have to worry about pregnancy in the future. She’ll need to talk to a medical professional about her individual health, symptoms, goals, and concerns. There are many forms of birth control available, each with different kinds of hormones (or no hormones) that affect the body differently.

 

Can a man with hyper-androgen take birth control pill to reduce acne, sebum in face and body hair?

Some types of birth control pills can help reduce acne in (cis) women and girls. Birth control really doesn’t have any effect on body hair.

“Male” hormones (like androgen and testosterone) would likely cancel out any effect of that the “female” hormones (estrogen and/or progesterone) in birth control would have in a man, so this wouldn’t be a good way to reduce acne.

Hormonal medications do come with risks, and because birth control pills aren’t meant for (cis) male bodies, there are much safer and more effective options to control acne. Talk with your medical provider to find an option that could work for you.

There aren’t really medications to control body hair, but there are other ways to change the amount of hair you have (such as shaving, waxing, plucking, or more permanent methods like electrolysis).

(We put male/ female hormones in quotation marks, because people of all genders have some amount of all of these hormones in their bodies.) 

i took my girl friend birth pill for a bet, what would happen to me after taking it?

If a male were to take just one birth control pill, the chances of anything at all happening would be very slim. Birth control pills contain a relatively low dose of hormones.

However, if a male took birth control pills that contain estrogen over a period of time, he might experience larger breasts, less facial hair, smaller testicles and a decreased sex drive. High levels of estrogen may also increase a man’s risk of an enlarged prostate and prostate cancer. There are cardiovascular risks that come along with long-term estrogen use that apply to people of any gender.

Hormonal medications can be complicated and do come with risks. No one should ever take any prescription medication that wasn’t given to them by a medical professional.

does it make your penis smaller if you take the birth control pill?

If someone with a penis takes the birth control pill just once or twice, probably nothing much will happen because of the relatively small dose of hormones. But if that person were to take hormonal birth control pills over an extended period of time, the estrogen in the pills can have an effect on their hormone levels and body.

Some effects of estrogen in a biologically “male body” can be shrinkage of the testicles and/or additional weight gain around the hips and breasts. It’s unlikely that penis size would be effected, though it could become more difficult to get an erection.

Hormonal medications come with health risks, so a person (of any gender) who wants to take a hormonal medication for any reason (to transition, as birth control, etc.) MUST consult with a medical provider. If you have questions about transitioning or effective birth control, click here to find a family planning clinic near you.

I had unprotected sex with my boyfriend last week. I am on the depo shot, but I finished a round of azithromycin less than two weeks before. The day after sex, I experienced light spotting and thought it was my period, but now I think that I may be pregnant. Although the doctor who prescribed the antibiotic said to use backup protection only for a week after, I am still very worried.

We know this can be stressful, but as long as you’ve stayed up to date on your Depo shot, your risk of pregnancy is probably very low. We don’t know what you were taking antibiotics for, but there’s a chance that the spotting could have been due to the infection you were treating and not to pregnancy. Some people also spot lightly after having sex.

The only way to know whether you’re pregnant is to take a pregnancy test. Maine Family Planning offers confidential, affordable pregnancy testing, and we can talk to you about your options going forward. Find a clinic near you: www.maineteenhealth.org/clinics

Antibiotics do not decrease the effectiveness of birth control.  We used to think so, and for years told people to use a back-up method (which is never a bad idea, but probably not necessary). Studies have now proven that antibiotics do not affect the effectiveness of hormonal birth control (unless the antibiotics make you sick and you vomit or have diarrhea after taking your birth control, but since you’re on the shot, this shouldn’t be a problem). There are other medications than can decrease the effectiveness of birth control like St. Johns Wort, some anti-seizure meds, and some meds used for mental health issues. You should always talk to your health care provider about all the medications you take and whether there are any possible interactions.

 

i am a boy age 25, by mistake i take one women’s birth control pill, is there any side effect or any any change in me?

If a male were to take just one birth control pill, the chances of anything at all happening would be very slim. Birth control pills contain a relatively low dose of hormones.

However, if a male took birth control pills that contain estrogen over a period of time, he might experience larger breasts, less facial hair, smaller testicles and a decreased sex drive. There are cardiovascular risks that come along with long-term estrogen use that apply to people of any gender.

Hormonal medications can be complicated and do come with risks. No one should ever take any prescription medication that wasn’t given to them by a medical professional.

If you ever take something that you think could hurt you, call poison control right away: 1-800-222-1222.

I had unprotected sex last night and I’m freaking out. What should I do?

It’s understandable that you’re worried, given the possible risks of having unprotected sex. But there are things you can do to reduce the negative effects of such an incident.

If you’re worried about pregnancy, you may want to consider getting emergency contraception as soon as possible. If the thought of catching an STD has you freaking out, you’ll want to consider getting tested. Although the day after having sex is too soon to get an STD test, you can call your local family planning clinic to find out when would be the best time to come in for a test.

How do you use a condom?

Congratulations! You have asked a very important question when it comes to preventing STDs and unplanned pregnancy.

The thing to remember about condoms is that it’s important to use one every time you have sex.

Our page on barrier methods has info about how to use both male and female condoms.

Why can’t teens be strong and learn how to say NO?

Hmmm, you raise an interesting question.

Since this is a teen sexual health website, let’s assume you’re asking about why teens have sex instead of practicing abstinence.

Sexuality is a natural, integral part of being alive and people have very different reasons for choosing whether and when to be sexually active. Many teens choose to be abstinent, to not have sex, until they are older and feel more ready. That’s a perfectly good decision. Likewise, deciding to have sex doesn’t necessarily mean a person is weak. It might be the result of a carefully thought out decision-making process.

If a teen does say ‘yes’ to having sex, it’s important to know all about STDs and birth control before becoming sexually active.

I use the Depo birth control shot. I have to go get the shot again in a few days. Will my birth control stop working?

Congratulations on using an effective birth control method to keep from getting pregnant until you decide the time is right!

Depo-Provera shots prevent pregnancy for 13 weeks after the shot is given. In order to be fully protected, you need to get another shot every 13 weeks. If you are due for your next shot, you can make an appointment at your nearest family planning clinic.

If you don’t get your next shot until AFTER 13 weeks have passed since your last shot, you definitely want to use a back up method (like condoms) because Depo is not effective at preventing pregnancy after the 13th week.

Are there different condom sizes? What if my condom doesn’t fit my boyfriend? Will it still work?

Condoms do come in different sizes and it’s a good idea to try different types to find the ones that work best for you and your partner. The important things are to be sure the condoms are latex or polyurethane because natural condoms don’t protect against HIV.

A condom that doesn’t stay on during sex isn’t going to provide protection from pregnancy or STDs. However, when condoms are used correctly every time, they can be as high as 97% effective. When they are not used each time or used incorrectly, their effectiveness can be as low as 86%.

I need to get my Mirena removed because I’m scared that it’s recalled and I’d rather choose a different IUD.

Contact your nearest family planning clinic to find out more about your particular IUD and whether you should get it changed. Your Mirena may not be on the recall list, but it’s still a good idea to find out for sure.

What will happen if I have sex at the last day my depo is due?

I think what you’re asking is whether you are still protected from getting pregnant during the time when you are due for your next Depo shot.  The answer is yes, as long as you are still within the time frame given to you by your health care provider.

Depo provides pregnancy protection for up to 14 weeks. If you aren’t late in getting your next shot, you are still okay but if you don’t want to get pregnant you’ll want to get your shot before that time frame runs out.

For more information about birth control or to get your next Depo shot, contact your nearest family planning clinic.

Can you get pregnant from pre-cum?

Thanks for the great question!  The short answer is… possibly.

During sex the penis releases two kinds of fluid, pre-ejaculate (pre-cum) and semen. Although pre-ejaculate fluid – by itself – does not contain sperm, if a male has had a recent ejaculation there may still be some sperm left in or around the urethra. So, if a male has masturbated or already had sex earlier, there may be some leftover sperm in his pre-ejaculate fluid.

And, it’s important to note, pre-ejaculate can transmit infections.

It’s always a good idea to use a condom if you want to prevent pregnancy and infection. Visit your nearest family planning clinic to get condoms and to learn more about pregnancy and STD prevention.

Does the pill Plan B hurt your ovaries?

Plan B is a form of emergency contraception that’s basically a higher-than-usual dose of birth control that a woman can take after unprotected sex to prevent a pregnancy. Nausea is a common side effect of Plan B and some women will have start their period early and have some associated cramping, but Plan B does not harm the ovaries in any way.

When I told my mom I was having sex, we went to the doctor and I had an Implanon implant put in 1.5 years ago and I want to have it removed but I don’t think my mom will like that idea. Am I allowed to go to a family planning clinic and choose another method of birth control?

It’s great that you were able to talk with your mom when you started having sex. I’m sure your mom cares about you and that’s why she’s trying to help you avoid early pregnancy.

Federal rules require confidentiality for all patients, including minors, at any family planning clinic.  That means you can access all our services without anyone else finding out.  This is different from other health care providers who may tell your parents about your visit and share your health care information.

If you are unhappy with your birth control method, you can certainly visit your nearest family planning clinic to talk with someone about making a change.

I had sex last night without a condom, and my girlfriend had her 2nd Depo Provera shot about 12 days ago. I pulled out, but is there any likely possibility of her being pregnant? I’m really worried.

If your girlfriend has recently had a Depo shot, then you don’t have to worry about her getting pregnant.  The shot is a long-lasting birth control method that provides excellent protection against unplanned pregnancy. It provides 13 weeks of coverage, so if she had her shot just twelve days ago you’re all set.

Using a condom is still a good idea if you want to be sure you’re protected from STDs as well as from an unplanned pregnancy.

Can you use plastic wrap as a condom? Will it work if you do?

Not really. There’s just no way to get plastic wrap into the right shape to prevent semen from spilling out. Condoms are your best bet for preventing pregnancy and STDs.

My boyfriend and I were fooling around about two weeks ago. He did not ejaculate, but I know that he had precum on the head of his penis.I am stressing out about pregnancy. My stomach is getting a little bloated and my breasts feel a bit tender. I’d like to think pregnancy is just all in my head. Judging from what has happened in my case, do you think I am pregnant?

There is a small chance of pregnancy occurring from pre-ejaculatory fluid. The only way to know for sure if you are pregnant is to get a pregnancy test done. If you get one at your local family planning clinic, and you are not pregnant, we can help you find a birth control method that works for you. That way, you’ll be protected from unplanned pregnancy and save yourself from the stress of worrying about it.

My girlfriend and I had sex a week ago. We used a condom but as I pulled out it stayed in her vagina. I didn’t fully cum and the precum was stuck in the tip of the condom. Is it possible for the precum to leak out and get her pregnant?

It’s great that you and your girlfriend are taking precautions and using condoms. Even if you don’t always get it right, using condoms is a great habit to get into for keeping you safe from STDs and preventing pregnancy.

Your question about pre-ejaculatory fluid is a good one. And the answer is that there is a small possibility of pregnancy occurring from precum. Using condoms and birth control is a great way to provide yourselves with extra protection. You can get both at your local family planning clinic.

How do you use a female condom? Is it hard to put it in and how do you put it in? My health teacher says you must be comfortable with your body; is he right? Why do you have to be comfortable with your body? What if you’re a little on the heavy side and you can’t see your area?

For females using the female condom, it makes sense that you’d want to be comfortable with your own body, because you or your partner would need to insert the female condom into your vagina before having sex.  This can be done by feel or by sight—for people of any size, using a mirror or asking a partner to help with insertion could make it easier to insert the condom.  No matter what form of protection people use, it’s always a good idea to be comfortable with your own body!

 

Here’s how it works: the female condom is tube-shaped, with a flexible ring on each end; it works by preventing sperm from getting into the vagina (so it can’t fertilize an egg). The inner ring at the closed end gets inserted all the way inside the vagina to hold it in place during sex. The outer ring at the open end stays on outside the vagina. The penis is inserted into the open end of the condom.

 

Some things to know: Female condoms are 79 – 95% effective at preventing pregnancy, and can also prevent STDs.  You should never use the female condom at the same time as the male condom, because the two condoms rubbing together can cause them to break.

Female condoms are latex-free, so they are safe to use by people with latex allergies.  You can find more about female condoms here.

Me and my girlfriend had sex one week ago. I didn’t ejaculate inside her but she thinks I might have pre-cumed inside of her. She is also on the implant, but she says shes getting head aches. Is she pregnant?

It’s smart for you both to be aware that pre-cum can carry some risk of pregnancy. There’s also a risk of STDs with pre-cum, so if you haven’t both been tested for STDs, it’s a good idea to use condoms.  The implant is very effective at preventing pregnancy (99% effective), so there is a very, very small chance that she could be pregnant. There’s also a chance that the headaches are either a side effect of the hormones in the implant or not related to her sexual health at all.

Bottom line is, we can’t diagnose pregnancy through our website, so if your girlfriend is concerned about pregnancy, side effects from the implant or other health issues, she could talk with someone at a family planning clinic near her.

what happens if a guy takes a birth control pill?

Most birth control pills are made from two hormones: estrogen and progestin (or progesterone).  Estrogen and progesterone are hormones that are made by the female body; however, low levels of these hormones are also made by the male body—estrogen for sperm development and sex drive, and progesterone to make testosterone.

If a male were to take just one birth control pill, nothing whatsoever would happen.

However, if a male took birth control pills that contain estrogen over a period of time, he might experience larger breasts, less facial hair, smaller testicles and a decreased sex drive. High levels of estrogen may also increase a man’s risk of an enlarged prostate and prostate cancer. According to a study published in Journal of the American Medical Association, achieving certain estrogen levels may protect men from heart disease and heart attack.

Until that time when medical science develops a birth control pill for males, it’s a good idea for guys to stick with using condoms for pregnancy and STD prevention.

 

Me and my boyfriend were fooling around and he was rubbing his penis on the outside of my vagina. He said there was no precum and it didn’t go in but it was wet down there. Then I got up and went to the bathroom and used tissue paper and dried everything out. Can I get pregnant? I’m really scared

There is a very slight risk of pregnancy from pre-ejaculatory fluid. You may want to get EC (emergency contraception) from your nearest family planning clinic. EC can be taken up to 5 days after you have had unprotected sex, but it’s more effective the sooner you take it. In addition to getting EC, you could also talk with a family planning specialist about getting on a regular form of birth control, if you want to prevent a pregnancy at this point in your life.

If I use my family’s insurance plan to help pay for birth control, will my parents be able to see that the insurance was used for birth control?

Yes, most likely your parents would receive an “Explanation of Benefits” or EOB for short.  This would list your name, the date of your office visit and what services you received.

If you need confidential services because you aren’t ready to tell your parents that you’re on birth control, it’s best to not use your parents’ insurance.

Federal rules assure your confidentiality if you get care at any family planning clinic. That means you can access all of these services without anyone else finding out. Sometimes, the best way to do this is to NOT use your parents’ insurance and instead apply for our discount program. Call the family planning clinic nearest you to find out more.

 

Even though you have a right to confidentiality at family planning, talking to someone you know and trust can help.  If you aren’t ready to talk to your parents, find another trusted adult or friend.

 

How much does a visit to the clinic cost when you go for an appointment to discuss birth control?

Our services are provided on what’s called a “sliding fee scale” and that means the price depends on your household income. For this reason, we really can’t give you an exact price on what a visit would cost you until you actually come in and share some household information with us.

We will never turn you away from getting birth control just because you can’t afford the visit. So you shouldn’t let worries about cost keep you from visiting us.

If you call the family planning clinic nearest you, they can help you set up an appointment to discuss birth control.

I’ve heard to always wear a condom. In that case, how do I pee?

I’m glad to hear that you’ve received messages about using condoms. Condoms are a great way to prevent STDs and they’re pretty good at preventing pregnancy too!

Here’s a helpful hint: you only need to wear a condom when you’re having sex. That should answer your question about what to do when you need to pee.

Don’t forget, you can get free condoms at your local family planning clinic.

I am on the depo provera shot and I was due for a shot from September 5 to October 20 and I got it on the 9 of September. I had unprotected sex a couple days later, and I usually have spotting but after my last shot which was my 3rd shot, I haven’t spotted at all. Could I be pregnant? My boyfriend pulled out before he came but I’m worried.

First of all, congratulations to you and your boyfriend for using an effective birth control method to avoid pregnancy.

We usually give people a two-week window for getting their follow-up Depo shot, so your shot was probably due September 5th – 20th.  If you had your shot on September 9th, you are well within the window and should have good birth control coverage. Many people find that after their third Depo shot, they stop spotting altogether, so what you’re experiencing is perfectly normal.

If you’re still worried about being pregnant, you can visit your local family planning health center for a “peace of mind” pregnancy test.

What is the most effective use of protection against pregnancy?

The most effective method of protection against pregnancy is the one you can use correctly and consistently, every time you have sex.

Most effective birth control methods can be separated into the following categories:

To talk with an expert about which method might be right for you, contact your local family planning health center.

How long does it take the NuvaRing to start working? How painful is it to put in? How expensive is it?

The NuvaRing is a painless, easy-to-use birth control method that is 98-99% effective at preventing pregnancy.

If you start using the NuvaRing on the first day of your menstrual cycle, it will work immediately. However, if you start any other time in your cycle, you will need to use an extra method of birth control, such as condoms, for seven days in order to give the hormones in the ring time to build up to full strength in your body.

All of Maine’s family planning health centers offer the NuvaRing on a sliding fee scale. The price you pay is based on information like your household income and the number of people in your household. Other factors may also be considered. Contact your local family planning clinic to learn more.

Remember, like all hormonal birth control methods, the NuvaRing does not protect against STDs. You’ll need to use condoms for that.

 

Can a hospital provide birth control?

Yes, some hospitals provide certain types of birth control to their patients under certain circumstances.  Many hospitals offer sterilization procedures like vasectomy for men and tubal ligation for women.  Most hospital emergency rooms offer emergency contraception for victims of sexual assault.

Maine’s family planning health centers offer many types of birth control at affordable prices.

can you get high off birth control oral contraceptives?

Nope, you can’t get high off oral contraceptive pills– but you can make yourself really sick!  Some of the most common side effects of the pill (when taken correctly– just one pill a day) are nausea and vomiting, headaches, and mood swings–so if someone were to take MORE than a normal dose of pills, they would probably feel these side effects even more intensely. 

So, you can’t get high off birth control pills, but taking them incorrectly CAN make someone feel really sick. 

How do you put a condom on?

Talk to your partner about using a condom ahead of time. Before using a condom, make sure the condom wrapper hasn’t been punctured and that the condom has not expired (there will be an expiration date on every condom package).  One you open the condom wrapper, make sure you know which way the condom unrolls. Pinch the tip of the condom (to allow space for semen) and unroll the condom all the way to the base of the penis.

Change the condom if the penis is exposed to a different part of the body (for example, from vagina to anus). Remove the condom immediately after you ejaculate (cum). Withdraw the penis while holding the rim of the condom at the base of the penis to prevent any semen from spilling out. Use a new condom each time you have sex. Do not use a male condom at the same time as the female condom and never use two condoms at once–this can cause them to break.  It’s a good idea to use a little bit of water-based lube on the outside of the condom, as this will make sex more comfortable for both partners.  Never use an oil-based lube (like Vaseline) with latex condoms, as it causes the latex to break down.

If you’re more of a visual learner, you can watch videos on how to use all different barrier methods here:

How to use a male condom: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HWUUkhKEXoI&feature=c4-overview&list=UUv_oL81rOx9K_XJ0Q6ViuOQ

How to put a condom on a partner: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-YFVOi6HDpg&list=UUv_oL81rOx9K_XJ0Q6ViuOQ

How to Use a Dental Dam: www.youtube.com/user/NAFAmeriCorpsTeamDC#p/a/u/1/hZv5kLuZrBY

How to Use a Female Condom: www.youtube.com/watch?v=LRZH5ASO-eM

You can get condoms at your local Family Planning clinic– we have both latex and non-latex condoms, as well as lubricant: www.maineteenhealth.org/clinics

My boyfriend is allergic to latex and polyurethane, and animal skin condoms are against his religious and moral beliefs. I’ve been on the depo provera shot for almost a year i’m thinking about using no other protection. Is there any other condom substitue that he and i can possibly use?

There is one more condom option: condoms made of a material called polyisoprene.  These are relatively new and may work best for you and your boyfriend.

Polyisoprene is a material similar to latex but is formulated to remove the compounds that cause irritation for those allergic to latex. Polyisoprene condoms feel similar to latex condoms (they are still thin and close-fitting) and are also close in price to traditional latex condoms. Currently, Lifestyles is the only company that makes polyisoprene condoms — they’re called Lifestyles SKYN.  We do carry non-latex/non-polyurethane condoms in most of our family planning clinics, though you may want to call ahead to make sure they’re in stock.

How much do female condoms cost?

Female condoms are pretty expensive in comparison to male condoms– they are usually between $4 – $7 at drugstores.  They’re a great option for women who want to have more control over condom use and for anyone with a latex allergy.  They are slightly less effective at preventing pregnancy than male condoms, but they’re a great method for preventing the spread of STDs, and work especially well in combination with another birth control method.

What if a guy takes a lot of birth control, will he grow boobs?

Most birth control pills are made from two hormones: estrogen and progestin (or progesterone).  Estrogen and progesterone are hormones that are made by the female body; however, low levels of these hormones are also made by the male body—estrogen for sperm development and sex drive, and progesterone to make testosterone.

If a male were to take just one birth control pill, nothing whatsoever would happen.

However, if a male took birth control pills that contain estrogen over a period of time, he might experience larger breasts, less facial hair, smaller testicles and a decreased sex drive. High levels of estrogen may also increase a man’s risk of an enlarged prostate and prostate cancer.

Until that time when medical science develops a birth control pill for males, it’s a good idea for guys to stick with using condoms for pregnancy and STD prevention.

How does sex feel?

Sex can feel lots of different ways depending on the situation.  If the people involved both truly want to do it, and they respect each other and can communicate with each other, then it can feel really good. But if a person is feeling pressured into doing it, is worried about pregnancy or STDs, or just isn’t into the person they are with, then it might not feel as good or could even feel bad.

It’s important to keep checking in with yourself about sex—is it what I want? Am I feeling pressured to do something I don’t really want? Am I pressuring my partner? Being able to talk with your partner about what you like and don’t like – and to feel empowered to stop or change what’s happening at any point, will help ensure that sex is a positive and pleasurable experience. Before, during and after sex happens – it’s good for you and your partner to talk, talk and talk some more!

Although sex can feel good, it comes with responsibility. Having a plan for a birth control method that will protect you against pregnancy and STDs will also make sex more worry-free and therefore more enjoyable. 

I had unprotected sex this morning and the guy didn’t use a condom but he came on my stomach. is there a possible chance some sperm went inside me?

It sort of depends on when the guy pulled out.  The “pull out” or withdrawal method– when the guy pulls out and ejaculates (cums) somewhere other than inside the vagina– can be an effective way to prevent pregnancy, but only if it’s done correctly every time. The penis releases two kinds of fluid, pre-ejaculate (pre-cum) and semen– if a guy doesn’t pull out in time and any fluid is released while the penis is still inside the vagina, there’s a chance that some fluid could make it into the vagina.

Although pre-cum by itself does not contain sperm, if a male has had a recent ejaculation there may still be some sperm left in or around the urethra. So, if a male has masturbated or already had sex earlier, there may be some leftover sperm in his pre-ejaculate fluid. It’s also worth noting that there’s a risk of transmitting STDs through pre-cum, so the withdrawal method is even less effective.

Risk of pregnancy is pretty low if your partner pulled out in time (before ANY fluids were released), but if you think that he ejaculated inside of you at all, there’s a chance some sperm made it inside of you.  If you think this happened and are concerned, you can call one of our Family Planning clinics to talk about EC (emergency contraception).

It’s also always a good idea to use a condom if you want to prevent pregnancy and STDs– Family Planning clinics can provide those, as well!

What does it mean to get your tubes tied that you can’t have sex?

Getting your tubes tied, or tubal ligation, is a surgical procedure in which the fallopian tubes are tied or cut in order to prevent eggs from being released from the ovaries into the uterus.  This is a very effective way to prevent pregnancy, but it is permanent, so is a good option only for those women who will never want to get pregnant again (or at all).

The fallopian tubes are inside the body, and having them tied or cut with this surgery doesn’t have any effect on whether a person can have sex. In fact, many people have this surgery so that they can still have sex without worrying about getting pregnant.

When girls are on their period and they have sex and the boy doesn’t use a condom would the girl get pregnant?

If the boy doesn’t use a condom and ejaculates (cums) into the vagina, the girl could get pregnant.

Although it’s most common for pregnancy to occur in the middle of a woman’s menstrual cycle (about two weeks before the first day of your period), pregnancy can occur at any time during the cycle.  This is because sperm can live for several days inside the body and wait around for an egg to be released, which can happen even a few days after the end of a woman’s period.

Abstinence, condoms, and other forms of birth control are all reliable ways to prevent pregnancy; having sex during your period is not an effective method of birth control.

Can birth control help prevent some types of STD’s?

The only birth control methods that protect against both pregnancy AND sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are barrier methods, which include male (external) and female (internal/ receptive) condoms. Dental dams can also protect against the transmission of STDs during oral sex.

How do you know if you’re ready for sex?

Knowing when you’re ready to have sex can be difficult, and choosing to have sex for the first time (or with a new partner, even if you’ve already had sex before) is a big decision. There’s no “test” for knowing, but if both people should consent fully, which means they enthusiastically and clearly agree to sexual activity without being pressured or threatened.

Sexuality is a natural, integral part of being alive and people have very different reasons for deciding whether and when to be sexually active. Many teens choose not to have sex, until they are older and feel more ready. That’s a perfectly good decision. Likewise, deciding to have sex doesn’t necessarily mean a person is weak. It might be the result of a carefully thought out decision-making process.

If you decide that you’re ready to have sex, it’s important to know all about STDs and birth control before becoming sexually active.

what do you do if your parents are kinda overprotective and you don’t want them to know you’re having sex but you want to start birth control?

We always encourage young people to talk with a parent or another adult that they trust about big personal decisions, like becoming sexually active and using birth control. It’s nice to have someone in your life that you can talk to about these things, but not everyone is going to be comfortable talking to their parents– that’s when it’s nice to have an older sibling, uncle or aunt, guidance counselor, or other adult you trust in your life.

That said, all of the services at Maine Family Planning clinics, including birth control, are confidential. That means that we won’t tell anyone about your care here, and you don’t need permission from your parents (or anyone else) to come to a family planning clinic, either. That’s not true of every doctor’s office, though, so if you go somewhere other than one of the clinics listed on our site, you’d want to talk with them about how they handle privacy and confidentiality.

Either way, using birth control if you are sexually active is a very responsible decision! You can make that decision for yourself and keep it private, if you choose.

Can taking Plan B twice in one month harm a girl with PCOS?

We can’t give medical advice here at MaineTeenHealth, but we do know that, as long as it’s okay for you to EVER take Emergency Contraception (Plan B), it’s perfectly safe to take it multiple times, even within the same month.

There may be reasons why your medical provider wouldn’t want you to take Emergency Contraception (EC) or other hormonal birth control, especially if you are a smoker, over thirty-five years old, or have other medical issues that put you at risk of blood clots or other complications. IN GENERAL, people with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) are usually able to take EC and other hormonal birth control, though only you and your health care provider can decide what is right for your body.

Even though it’s safe to take EC multiple times, it’s not the most effective method of preventing pregnancy, so it might be a good idea to talk with your health care provider or someone at a Family Planning clinic about a regular method of birth control that you can depend on. Many forms of birth control even HELP some women with PCOS cope with their symptoms!

I don’t understand something. People are always saying to have protected sex to prevent pregnancy and stds…but what if you want to get pregnant? Like if you just married and want to start a family..should you still have protected sex?

It sounds like you understand more than you think you do!

You’re right: in order to prevent pregnancy and STDs, it’s important to use reliable birth control, barrier methods, or abstain from sex. Birth control, condoms, and abstinence all prevent pregnancy; ONLY condoms and abstinence prevent the spread of STDs (birth control methods alone won’t protect against STDs).

However, if you aren’t worried about preventing STDs (hopefully, because you’ve both been tested and, if necessary, treated for any STDs), and if you WANT to get pregnant, you wouldn’t need to use birth control or condoms/ protection. Counselors at Family Planning clinics are great at talking with patients about planning for starting a family, and can answer questions about what methods work best for people until they are ready to have children.

what are the side effects of the pill?

The most common side effects of the pill include breast tenderness, nausea, spotting between periods, and decreased sex drive. The pill also has benefits, like clearer skin and lighter, less crampy periods.

There are many different kinds of birth control pills, so if you’re interested in using the pill as birth control, visit your local family planning clinic to talk with a medical provider about which pill might work best and what side effects you can expect.

Why do people say pregnancy is such a bad thing?! I mean, yes, when you’re a teen it might be difficult, but what if you’re a married adult. Don’t you have to get pregnant to have kids?! I’m so confused…without our mums getting pregnant..we would be here, so why does everyone say ALWAYS use protection.

There’s nothing bad about pregnancy; it’s a very common way for people to become parents. Our goal is to help people prevent pregnancy until they feel ready to have a child.

Because becoming pregnant and having a child as a teen is especially challenging, we place special emphasis on helping teens delay pregnancy and childbearing. We would never tell someone they should NEVER get pregnant and have children.

We help and advise people to use birth control UNTIL they are feeling ready to plan a pregnancy.  And when a person is feeling ready, we also help with planning for a healthy pregnancy.

 

How do I get condoms?

It’s great that you’re planning ahead to get STD and pregnancy protection! You can get condoms several ways.

Your local family planning clinic provides free and low-cost condoms.

You can also buy condoms at most drugstores, supermarkets, and convenience stores; but the prices will most likely be higher than they will at family planning.

Also, some school health centers provide free condoms to students.

If me and my girl had sex on the 24th and i cummed in her and she gets her next depo shot on the 28th. is she pregnant? i’m scared:(

It’s really great that you’re supporting your partner in her wish to not get pregnant at this time.  Here’s the answer to your excellent question:

The Depo Provera shot is over 99% effective at preventing pregnancy as long as the injection is given every 12 -13 weeks. As long as it hasn’t been more than 12 – 13 weeks since her last shot, she should still be protected from pregnancy.

There’s always some level of pregnancy risk, EVEN when a girl is on birth control, and especially if it’s been more than 13 weeks since her last shot.

If she is worried, she could ask for a pregnancy test when she gets her next shot on the 28th. Family Planning clinics offer affordable, confidential pregnancy tests and depo shots at all locations.

I’m a male taking female birth control. Will breasts and larger thighs develop?

Over time, there’s a chance that taking a very low dose of estrogen, as found in birth control, could lead to some weight gain around the hips and chest, but while your body is still producing androgen and testosterone (“male” hormones) naturally, the amount of estrogen found in these pills may not result in any changes at all. It is very important to talk with a medical provider about why you want to take any medication, because taking the wrong kind of hormone(s) in the wrong amount could lead to serious risks without any of the intended benefits.

Hormonal birth control can be complicated and definitely come with risks. Anyone taking hormonal medication for any reason MUST see a medical provider to make sure that they are taking the right medications in the right dose, because hormones can have serious risks and side effects. The best thing to do is to talk with a health care provider– a provider at Maine Family Planning could help answer your questions.

Does a nurse practictioner dialate the cevix before putting in an IUD?

Most of the time, a Nurse Practitioner does NOT need to dilate the cervix in order to insert an IUD. We often recommend that people get an IUD inserted when they are having their period, because the cervix is already a little “soft” and dilated during that week.

Occasionally, if the opening to the cervix (called the os) is too tight to allow the provider to measure the size of the uterus), she or he might use a small plastic dilator to try to get it to open up just a bit. Even in this case, the cervix would only be dilated a millimeter or so.

IUD insertion can be uncomfortable and sort of crampy, but most people tolerate the procedure just fine and the sensation goes away quickly (most people feel like they just have regular period cramps by the time they walk out of the office).

What’s the best birth control?

There are pros and cons associated with every birth control method. Some are really good at preventing pregnancy without requiring you to remember to do very much (like IUDs, the implant, and the shot). Others require you to think about the method more often, like the pill (which you take every day), the patch (change once a week) or the ring (change every 3 -4 weeks). Condoms aren’t as effective at preventing pregnancy, but they ARE the only birth control method that prevents STDs! Different methods have different side effects (and benefits!), too, so it’s a great idea to talk about all the different options with a health care provider.

When used correctly, all of the methods that we provide at Maine Family Planning  work really well to prevent pregnancy– when combined with condoms, they work even better AND prevent the spread of STDs.

The bottom line is that the best birth control is the one that works best for YOU!

I have been on the shot for a month now & I have been really cranky & I don’t know if it is because of the shot or not?

Because hormones and hormonal changes can affect mood (for people of any gender), it’s not unusual to experience some mood swings when you start the Depo Provera shot or any other hormonal birth control method (including the pill, patch, ring, or implant).

Once you’ve had a depo injection, the medicine is in your body for 12 -13 weeks. That’s good news for preventing pregnancy, but it also means that the side effects of the shot may not “shut off” until your body adjusts or the medication works its way out of your system.

We can’t say for sure whether your crankiness is related to the shot or to other things going on in your life, but if side effects of the shot are making you uncomfortable after two shots in a row (sometimes it just takes your body a little while to get used to the new medication), it might be a good idea to talk to a medical provider about finding a different method that will work for you.

If you’re experiencing sadness, depression, or other negative feelings most days over the course of a couple weeks or more, it’s a good idea to talk to someone about the way you’re feeling. You could talk to an adult you trust, a mental health professional, or you can come to a Family Planning clinic to talk about how your birth control and relationships are making you feel and where to find more support. If you’re in crisis or just need someone to talk to, the Maine Crisis Hotline can help.

If i have sex and the condom does not break, do i still have to take birth control?

Male (external) and female (receptive) condoms are the only form of contraception that protects against both pregnancy and STDs, which makes them a great method. Condoms are inexpensive, non-hormonal, and they don’t require a prescription or visit to the doctor. Partners of any gender can take the initiative to obtain and use them.

When condoms are used correctly and consistently, they can be between 95 – 98% effective at preventing pregnancy; this means that only 2 – 5 out of 100 people will get pregnant if they use condoms (correctly, every time) as their only form of birth control. However, not everyone uses them correctly every single time, so with typical use (which factors in normal human mistakes), the effectiveness of condoms can fall as low as 79 – 82%.

Whether you want to use an additional birth control method is completely up to you to decide (along with the support of your health care provider!). If it is very important to you to not get pregnant, using an additional birth control method along with a condom reduces the risk of pregnancy to less than 1%. There are lots of birth control methods to choose from, so talk with your health care provider about what might work for you.

While it’s a great idea to use two methods to prevent pregnancy and STDs—a form of birth control along with a condom—you NEVER want to use two condoms at a time; the friction between the two condoms can cause them to break.

You can get condoms by stopping into a Family Planning clinic anytime—you don’t need an appointment! You can also make an appointment to discuss other birth control options at any of our sites.

me and my boyfriend had sex for two days. He fully came inside of me on both days. And I am on the depo shot. Can I still get pregnant?

Depo Provera (the shot) is about 99% effective at preventing pregnancy as long as the injection is given every 12 – 13 weeks by a health care provider.

No birth control is 100% effective at preventing pregnancy, but as long as it’s been less than 13 weeks from your last depo shot, your chance of pregnancy is very low (less than 1%).

Using condoms in addition to the shot decreases the risk of pregnancy even more, AND prevents sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).

 

If you have unsafe sex with an infected person, will you get pregnant, an sti, or both?

We’re guessing that when you say “infected person,” you mean a person who has a sexually transmitted disease (STD) [link to our STD page: http://www.maineteenhealth.org/stds/].

Having unprotected vaginal, anal, or oral sex with a person who has an STD does put you at risk for contracting that STD. To reduce the risk of infection, you can abstain (not engage in sexual activity), or you can use barrier methods, such as condoms and dental dams, to reduce the risk of transmission during sexual activity. Some STDs can be cured and all of them can be treated; if a person with an STD gets treatment through a medical provider, the risk of passing along that STD also decreases.

Unprotected vaginal intercourse (“penis in vagina” sex without the use of a condom or other birth control method) always carries some risk of pregnancy, regardless of whether either person does or does not have an STD. The only way to reduce the risk of pregnancy is to abstain from vaginal sex or to use contraception.

I’ve been on the depo since I was 16, I am now 18. My next appointment for the shot is 5-19th of this month, and today is the 16th. Is the depo still 99.7% effective even though I’m nearing my date?

First off, good for you for finding and using a reliable birth control method!

The Depo Provera shot is over 99% effective at preventing pregnancy as long as the injection is given every 12 -13 weeks. As long as it hasn’t been more than 12 – 13 weeks since your last shot, you should still be protected from pregnancy. We’re not sure when you had your last shot, but the due date that your healthcare provider gave you SHOULD fall within the time-frame you mentioned.

There’s always some level of pregnancy risk, EVEN when a woman is on birth control, and especially if it’s been more than 13 weeks since her last shot. If you are worried, it would be a good idea to use condoms until your next depo shot.

Family Planning clinics can usually get people in for same-day or next-day appointments, if you need your next shot right away! We offer affordable, confidential services, including condoms and depo injections, at all locations.

I put in the nuvaring after ending my period. How long does it take to build up in your system?

If you start using the NuvaRing (for the first time) during days 2 – 5 of your period or after your period ends, it will take 7 days for the hormones to “build up” enough to prevent pregnancy.

If you have (vaginal) sex during those first 7 days, you’ll need to make sure to use an back-up method, such as male or female condoms, in order to prevent pregnancy. After that, as long as you insert a new ring every 4 weeks (28 days), you’ll be protected from pregnancy going forward.

if i am supposed to have my period at the beginning of this week and don’t have it, should i call family planning services to schedule an appt for a pregnancy test?

If you have had unprotected sex in the last couple months, are not on birth control (or are worried that you’ve made mistakes in taking your birth control, like missing pills or forgetting to replace your patch), AND you’re late for your period, it’s probably a good idea to call a family planning clinic to schedule an appointment for a pregnancy test. If your period is really late but you haven’t had unprotected sex, it’s a good idea to give us a call anyway– we can help you figure out what’s going on with your period.

If it turns out that you are pregnant, our providers can talk to you about all of your options. If it turns out that you’re not pregnant, they can start you on a birth control method or help you find a more reliable method than the one you’re using now.

We always encourage young people to talk to an adult they can trust, but you should also know that all of the services at Maine Family Planning (and Planned Parenthood) clinics are confidential and affordable.

 

Me & my boyfriend had unprotected sex about 4 days ago (and he came in me) and after we decided we weren’t ready to try so the next day I put my birth control in. (Nuvaring, a week late putting it in). The same day I put my Nuvaring in is the same day my fertility cycle started, what are my chances of being pregnant?

We can’t tell you your chances of being pregnant (every person is different and individual fertility is a hard thing to predict), but based on what you’ve told us, it sounds like you were NOT protected from pregnancy when you had unprotected sex 4 days ago.

Nuvaring starts working immediately if you insert it during the first day of your period, but if you insert it later in your cycle (and it sounds like you probably did), you’re not protected from pregnancy for another 7 days after the ring is inserted.

Because it can take up to 5 days after intercourse for pregnancy to actually happen, you may still have time to prevent pregnancy by taking Emergency Contraception (EC). Plan B is available over the counter (at your local drug store) or at any Family Planning clinic, though it’s less effective later than three days after sex. Ella is a prescription EC pill that can prevent pregnancy up to 5 days after unprotected sex– if you’re interested in taking Ella, you should call your local Family Planning Clinic or your regular provider right away!

 

What happens when a guy takes hormonal pill and what is the most effective hormonal pill?

Seems like there are two questions here.

The first is what happens if a guy takes a hormonal pill– we’re assuming you mean a hormonal birth control pill.

Over time (if pills are taken regularly), there’s a chance that taking a super low dose of estrogen, as found in birth control, could lead to some weight gain around the hips and chest, but while a guy is still producing testosterone naturally, pills may not result in any changes at all.

However, if a person wants to take a hormonal medication– for birth control, because they are interested in transitioning genders, or for any other reason–they MUST see a medical provider to make sure that they are taking the right medications in the right dose, because hormones can have serious risks and side effects.

Your second question is what is the most effective hormonal pill– we’re not sure what kind of effectiveness you’re asking about, but we usually talk about effectiveness in terms of preventing pregnancy. Different pills will work differently for different bodies, and because birth control pills require a prescription, the best way for a person to know what will work best is to meet with a health care provider.

If you are talking about effectiveness for a different reason (like transitioning genders), birth control pills would NOT be effective. Our providers at Lewiston Family Planning could answer questions about hormone therapy for transitioning.

Hormonal medications can be complicated and do come with risks. The best thing to do is to talk with a health care provider– a provider at Maine Family Planning could help answer your questions.

How and what do I say when asking my dad to go on the birth control pill?

It’s great that you are thinking about talking to your dad about birth control; we think it’s great when young people can talk to the adults in their lives about their health and relationships. Using birth control and condoms is mature and responsible, and so is talking with your parent(s) about it.

It can be an awkward or difficult conversation, but if your dad is a safe and understanding person in your life, he’ll probably be glad that you’re able to talk to him. That said, keep in mind that it’s okay for some things about your personal life to remain private—you can have an honest conversation and still have boundaries about what you’re willing to discuss.

It’s a parent’s job to help their kids stay safe and happy. Tell your dad that protecting yourself against STDs and pregnancy is important to you, and you want his help and support. Hopefully, your dad will be able to talk with you openly and honestly and give you the support you need. That might mean that he brings you to your local family planning clinic, help you pay for birth control, or just that he won’t be surprised if he sees your pills in the bathroom.

If it’s not safe or possible for you to talk to your dad, you should know that teens have the right to confidential reproductive health care in Maine. That means that you can get birth control without a parent’s permission and the clinic won’t tell your parents about your care.

Need more tips? Here’s more great advice from Scarleteen.

What’s emergency contraception?

Emergency Contraception (EC) is a pill you can take if you’ve had unprotected sex. It is a hormonal medication that prevents the release of an egg. It does not cause abortion. EC can be taken up to 5 days after you have had unprotected sex, but it’s more effective the sooner you take it. If you are already pregnant, it doesn’t  hurt the pregnancy in any way.

You can get EC from a Maine Family Planning clinic, your local drug store, or from a pharmacy.

Get more information on our site.

Why do health teachers and other people make sex seem like a scary thing? I mean it’s how babies are made,so why is it such a bad thing?

Sex isn’t a bad thing (as long as it’s consensual) and it doesn’t have to be scary. Some of the consequences of sex can be “scary” or undesirable, and there’s a chance that teachers and other adults are trying to protect you from those consequences by emphasizing them.

Sex can result in sexually transmitted diseases/ infections (STDs), pregnancy, and a whole bunch of emotions. Some of those emotions are great, and sometimes people WANT to get pregnant. If people want to avoid STDs and/or pregnancy but still want to have sex, there are many different forms of birth control available (to prevent pregnancy), and using condoms can greatly reduce the risk of STDs.

As for the emotional risks involved in sex, there’s no magic pill or condom for that– and there will be emotions involved in any relationship, whether or not sex is involved. Waiting until you and your partner are both ready before having sex (and both consent), communicating about what you do (and don’t) want, and being honest with each other are all important aspects for a healthy relationship.

If you and your partner are able to have honest and open communication, are protecting yourselves from pregnancy (until you’re ready to have kids), and protecting yourselves from STDs, sex doesn’t have to be scary at all.

what is emergency contraception?

Emergency Contraception (EC) is a pill you can take if you’ve had unprotected sex. It is a hormonal medication that prevents the release of an egg. It does not cause abortion. EC can be taken up to 5 days after you have had unprotected sex, but it’s more effective the sooner you take it. If you are already pregnant, it doesn’t  hurt the pregnancy in any way.

You can get EC from a Maine Family Planning clinic, your local drug store, or from a pharmacy.

Get more information on our site.

 

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