LGBTQ

What’s chest binding?

Chest binding is when a person flattens or otherwise restricts their breasts/ breast tissue in order to appear to have a flatter chest. Chest binding is most commonly practiced among transgender men and people who were born with a female body but who want to present as more masculine or androgynous to the outside world.

There are safe and unsafe ways to bind. You shouldn’t use duct tape or ACE bandages, and you shouldn’t bind for more than 10 hours a day or while sleeping. There are several kinds of binders (an undergarment made especially for binding) and some types of sports bras that are safer and more comfortable options.

More information on chest binding, binders, and physical (and mental!) health can be found here.

Will hormonal birth control pills make me a woman? I really want to be a woman.

The short answer is no– no matter what your sex or gender is. The hormones in birth control pills are not strong enough to change your physical characteristics, feminize your body, or help you medically transition. Hormonal medications do have some risks, and it’s very important that you only take hormones under the supervision of a medical provider.

If you’re a person who was assigned female at birth (you were born with a vagina, uterus) and you’re asking because you want to speed up puberty and grow up faster, hormonal birth control pills don’t offer a high enough dose to speed or significantly impact development. If you’re concerned about your development, it’s a good idea to see a medical provider to discuss your concerns.

If you’re a person who was assigned male at birth (you were born with a penis, testicles) and you’re asking because you want to medically transition your gender, birth control pills don’t have a high enough dose of hormones to help with transition. If you are interested in hormonal therapy for gender transition, it’s very important to do this with the guidance of a medical professional. You would need a medication to suppress your body’s natural hormones, a therapeutic dose of hormones (higher than birth control), and regular blood tests to make sure you’re healthy and safe.

If you’re an intersex person and you’re asking because you want hormones for feminization or medical transition, the dose of hormones in birth control pills is not strong enough to feminize or aid transition. If you are interested in talking about hormonal therapy, it’s very important to do so under the guidance of a medical professional.

I’m taking estrogen gel caps for about one and a half month to get breast can I take progesterone too?

We can’t give medical advice online.

Any time you’re taking medication, especially hormones, it’s important to have the guidance of a medical professional. They can help you figure out the right dosing, monitor your body’s hormone levels to make sure you’re getting the right amount through medication, and can help manage any side effects or reactions your body might have to the meds.

If you’re 18 or older, you can get hormonal therapy at Lewiston Family Planning. You can also check out Maine TransNet for more information and resources.

So recently I came out to my parents as Bi-sexual. and they didn’t seem to care. When I told my dad he said “I don’t care, be whoever you want to be, I don’t give a f***, all I care about is your grades in school”. Do my parents hate me????

Coming out can be really difficult, and we’re proud of you for doing this! It’s not always easy to talk to your parents about who you are, but it’s important.

We don’t know how your parents feel about you– only they know that, and you should have a conversation with them if and when you feel comfortable talking more about your identity and relationships. It doesn’t sound like they hate you, though– despite some gruff language, it sounds like they might still be processing what you told them and the thing they care most about right now is your education.

We talk about coming out like it’s a one-time thing, but the truth is that it’s an ongoing process. You and your parents  will probably have many more conversations about your identity going forward, especially if/ when  you start dating and having relationships. The most important thing is that you’re able to be open, honest, and communicate safely with each other. Sometimes that takes practice and many conversations, so keep talking to your parents. You’ve probably known that you’re bisexual for a while, but they are just finding out and may need more time to figure out how they feel and what questions they have.

You deserve the love and support of your family, no matter what your sexual orientation is or who you’re in a relationship with. If you feel that you’re not getting the support and care you need, it might be a good idea to talk with another adult you trust (like a school counselor, aunt or uncle, etc.).

i took some female contraception pill what would that mean if i took them every day for the next 30 days?

It depends on whether you were born with biologically male or female anatomy.

If you were born with female anatomy (you have a uterus and ovaries), taking birth control every day for 30 days would be a way to prevent pregnancy. Some side effects could include tender breasts, headaches, and changes in your period.

If you were born with male anatomy (you have a penis and testicles), taking birth control pills every day for 30 days would probably not do a lot, but there could be some slight effects. While your body is still making “male” hormones (testosterone and androgen), the small amount of hormone in the pills probably wouldn’t have a big effect. Over enough time (probably longer than 30 days), taking birth control pills could lead to some increase in fat around the hips and chest/ breasts.

If a person wants to take a hormonal medication–to transition, for birth control, or for any other reason–they MUST see a medical provider to make sure that they are taking the right medications in the right dose, because hormones can have serious risks and side effects.

If you think are a transgender teen, we recommend that you connect with a good support person/network. Do you have a trusted adult you can talk with about your gender identity? If not, is there a local LGBTQ youth group in your area? A really good place to start is Maine TransNet, which offers information on local support groups and other resources; they can even connect you with a counselor who you can talk with. If you’re 18 or over, you can call Lewiston Family Planning to talk about hormonal transition.

should my boyfriend use contraceptive pills?

Probably not.

If you boyfriend is a cisgender man and wants to prevent getting anyone pregnant, taking contraceptive pills won’t work. The only effective birth control options for cisgender men (right now) are condoms and vasectomy/ sterilization.

If your boyfriend is “biologically” a man but is interested in transitioning using hormones (maybe identifies as transgender), contraceptive pills would not be a good option. The hormones aren’t strong enough for transition. It’s also very important that medical/ hormonal transition is done under the care of a medical professional. Lewiston Family Planning can help those 18 and over.

If your boyfriend is a transgender man and wants to take contraceptive pills to prevent pregnancy, he should talk to his health care provider. This could be a good option depending on his goals, what works for his body, and other medications he’s taking.

i am a male / female, i dress as female everyday and i would like to start to use tampons when it get close to the end of the month as i feel like a female all the time so i would like to wear a tampons i am wondering if there is any risk of using them?

While it sounds like your gender identity is female, it’s not completely clear to us from your message what kind of body parts you have.

If you have biologically “female” body parts (a vagina, a uterus), it’s safe and normal to use tampons during your period.

If you have biologically “male” body parts (a penis, testicles), it would not be safe to use tampons. Tampons are made to be inserted into the vagina during menstruation, and are not meant to be inserted into the anus or other body parts. Because of the sensitive tissue inside the anus and the fact that it does not self-lubricate, tampons could cause irritation, tearing, or other damage to your body.

It’s important for people of all genders and with all kinds of body parts to find safe ways to express their gender identities.

how long can a male be on female birth control before his breasts grow and how long before his prostate is in danger?

Generally if a male starts on estrogen, including that in regular birth control pills, he should start to see breast development in 3 to 6 months.  These hormones do not put his prostate in danger.

The estrogen in birth control pills is ethinyl estradiol and that is not considered the best kind of estrogen for a male who wants to transition to a female to be on.  There seem to be more risks and potential complications with that kind of estrogen rather than the usual estradiol that we use.

We would suggest that any male who wants to transition to a female make an appointment with a provider who is skilled and comfortable providing hormones and guidance to help them transition as safely as possible.  We provide that service to people 18 years and older at our Lewiston and Waterville family planning clinics.  In addition to estrogens, we also prescribe testosterone blockers that help make for a smoother faster transition than using just estrogens. Click here for more information.

what happens if a man takes premak c?

We think you might mean Prempak-C, which is a hormone replacement medication meant for people with biologically female bodies (usually taken by women after menopause).

Over time (if taken regularly), there’s a chance that taking this kind of hormonal pill could lead to some weight gain (mostly around the hips and chest), but while a guy is still producing testosterone naturally, adding female hormones may not result in any changes at all.

If a person wants to take a hormonal medication because they are interested in transitioning genders, they MUST see a medical provider to make sure that they are taking the right medications in the right dose, because hormones can have serious risks and side effects. A man who wants to transition to female by taking hormones would also need to take a medicine to BLOCK the male hormones that his body already produces, otherwise there wouldn’t be much of an effect. Our providers at Lewiston Family Planning can  answer questions about hormone therapy for transitioning.

Hormonal medications can be complicated and do come with risks. The best thing to do is to talk with a health care provider– a provider at Maine Family Planning could help answer your questions. Because of health risks due to side effects or combining medications, you should never take anything without talking with a health care provider first.

why do guys want to become girls and girls want to become guys?

As a society, we attach certain expectations, roles, and rules to a person’s biological sex; these culturally-created expectations are called “gender.” Some people feel that their gender and their biological sex/ physical bodies match up;  we refer to these people as cisgender. For others, these things don’t match, and they may transition to a gender different than the one they were assigned at birth. We call these people transgender (or gender non-conforming).

Everyone has a gender identity (the way we feel inside) and we all express our gender to the world in certain ways– including wearing certain clothes, having a particular hairstyle, or going by a name that matches our gender. Some trans people choose clothes, names, and other ways of expressing their gender that are different than what society expects. Some trans people change their bodies by using hormones or having surgery to better match their gender presentation (the way the world sees them) to their gender identity (the way they feel inside).

The biological sex someone is born with really doesn’t tell us much about what gender identity they’ll have. One way of thinking about it is that it’s not that “guys want to become girls and girls want to become guys,” but that people want to be able to determine their own gender and not have it decided for them based on their body parts.

does it make your penis smaller if you take the birth control pill?

If someone with a penis takes the birth control pill just once or twice, probably nothing much will happen because of the relatively small dose of hormones. But if that person were to take hormonal birth control pills over an extended period of time, the estrogen in the pills can have an effect on their hormone levels and body.

Some effects of estrogen in a biologically “male body” can be shrinkage of the testicles and/or additional weight gain around the hips and breasts. It’s unlikely that penis size would be effected, though it could become more difficult to get an erection.

Hormonal medications come with health risks, so a person (of any gender) who wants to take a hormonal medication for any reason (to transition, as birth control, etc.) MUST consult with a medical provider. If you have questions about transitioning or effective birth control, click here to find a family planning clinic near you.

I am a male. If I used birth control pills i will get woman breasts? How long would it be before I see results?

If a person wants to take a hormonal medication–to transition, for birth control, or for any other reason–they MUST see a medical provider to make sure that they are taking the right medications in the right dose, because hormones can have serious risks and side effects.

Over time, there’s a chance that taking a very low dose of estrogen, as found in birth control, could lead to some weight gain around the hips and breasts, but while your body is still producing androgen and testosterone (“male” hormones) naturally, the small amount of estrogen found in these pills probably wouldn’t result in any changes at all. Most people who take hormones in order to transition also have to take medications to block the hormones (testosterone) that their bodies are already making, otherwise additional hormones (like estrogen) won’t have much of an effect. Again, it is very important to talk with a medical provider before taking any medications, because taking the wrong kind of hormone(s) in the wrong amount could lead to serious risks without any of the benefits.

If you think are a transgender teen, we recommend that you connect with a good support person/network. Do you have a trusted adult you can talk with about your gender identity? If not, is there a local LGBTQ youth group in your area? A really good place to start is Maine TransNet, which offers information on local support groups and other resources; they can even connect you with a counselor who you can talk with.

Hormonal medications can be complicated and definitely come with risks. The best thing to do is to talk with a health care provider– for those 18 and over, Lewiston Family Planning does offer hormonal transition therapy.

Best natural way for a man to grow female breast?

“Natural” means different things to different people, but we don’t know of good, effective, safe ways to grow breasts without taking medication or having surgery.

People who are assigned male at birth often grow breasts by taking hormones and hormone blockers. It’s very important to see a health care provider for hormonal therapy; the type and dosage of hormones will depend on your own body, health, and goals. Hormonal medications also have some risks, so it’s important to have a health provider tracking your health.

Some people add breasts or increase breast size through surgery. You’d definitely need to see a health provider if interested in surgery.

For those 18 years old and over, Maine Family Planning can provide hormonal therapy for gender transition.

if I a man take female hormone pills will I develop breasts like a female?

Over time, there’s a chance that taking a very low dose of estrogen, as found in birth control, could lead to some weight gain around the hips and chest, but while your body is still producing androgen and testosterone (“male” hormones) naturally, the amount of estrogen found in these pills may not result in any changes at all.

It is very important to talk with a medical provider about why you want to take any medication, because taking the wrong kind of hormone(s) in the wrong amount could lead to serious risks without any of the intended benefits.

A person taking any hormonal medication for ANY reason MUST see a medical provider to make sure that they are taking the right medications in the right dose, because hormones can have serious risks and side effects. The best thing to do is to talk with a health care provider– a provider at Maine Family Planning could help answer your questions. Our Lewiston clinic specializes in hormonal therapy for transgender patients.

I’m a girl and I don’t really find boys attractive, does this mean I’m gay?

It may or it may notSexual orientation is complex and not necessarily black and white.  Some people know from an early age that they are gay, or that they are straight.  Others learn about their orientation over time.  The important thing is that you stay true to your feelings and don’t pressure yourself one way or the other.  Be patient and accept yourself however you turn out.

My dads gay, and him and his boyfriend told me their having a baby, is this true?

We don’t know your dad or his boyfriend, so we don’t know whether they are telling you the truth or not.

In general, two men can have a baby in a few different ways. They can adopt a baby, they can use a surrogate (a woman who carries the pregnancy and gives birth, and then the men adopt the baby when it’s born), or if one of the men in the couple is a transgender man who still has his uterus, he could get pregnant and carry the pregnancy/ have the baby.

There are all kinds of ways for people to build their families, no matter their sex or gender. If your dad is a person you trust, he’s likely telling you the truth. If you’re comfortable, you should ask him to talk with you about this.

 

Can guys get pregnant?

Pregnancy requires a fertilized egg and a uterus where a fetus can grow and develop. For most of the population, this means being a female.

However, some female-to-male transgender people can become pregnant, while still identifying and living as men. This is possible for individuals who still have functioning ovaries and a uterus.

How do you tell your parents that you’re bisexual?

It’s great that you’re thinking about talking with your parents about your sexual orientation. There are definitely some things to consider when planning for that conversation.

Here’s a good list of questions to consider before you have the talk.

 

I’m gay and i like my teacher, so what should I do?

You raise a couple of issues in your question: sexual orientation and teacher fixation.

To have strong feelings for a person in a position of authority or trust is very common. Many people have at least one experience in their life of crushing on their teacher, physician, nurse, therapist, or other professional healer or helper. However, acting on these feelings in real life is another matter.

A teacher holds a position of trust with young people and it would be against the law for a teacher to undertake an intimate, personal relationship – not directly related to his/her work – with any young person under the age of 18.

Have you considered getting involved in social or academic groups, both in school and out of school? Such groups might allow you to meet people your age, with similar interests with whom you can develop relationships. Does your school have a Gay-Straight Alliance? If not, our LGBTQ resource page has listings for several youth groups in Maine.

How can two women have sex?

When they hear the word “sex,” the first thing that comes to mind for a lot of people is penis-in-vagina sex that’s associated with heterosexual intercourse. That’s not the only activity considered “sex” ~ there’s oral, anal, and manual (using fingers/hands) sex. People of any gender and sexual orientation can engage in these.

Sex between two women (or two men) often feels like a mystery, since we don’t hear about that kind of intimate activity in sex education classes, in movies, music or TV shows ~ those places where we get a lot of our information about sexuality. The truth is that sex between two women (or any two individuals) is different for every couple and will vary from person to person, couple to couple, and even from week to week. It depends on the preferences, levels of trust, and readiness of the individuals involved.

Finally, while sex between two women won’t result in pregnancy, it can still spread STDs and is as emotionally serious as sex between two people of different genders.

what if you don’t have a penis?

Not everyone has a penis.  Women, for instance, usually don’t have a penis.

While most males have penises and most women do not, that’s not true for everyone.  Some people are transgender, which mean that they might identify as a gender that doesn’t match up with all their body parts– so a transgender man might not have a penis, and a transgender woman might have one.  About one in a hundred people are Intersex, which means they were born with biological differences that do not fit neatly into the typical definitions of male or female, and their genitals may look different from what most people expect. These differences may be noticed at birth or later in life when the person has tests for other medical reasons.

No matter if you’re male, female, transgender, or intersex, a penis is not necessary to have a healthy and normal sex life.

can two lesbians get pregnant?

A lesbian couple can definitely get pregnant– they’ll just need to go about it a different way than most heterosexual couples.  Because pregnancy requires both sperm and an egg, and because women’s bodies don’t make sperm, many lesbian couples who want to get pregnant often use alternative fertilization methods, like artificial insemination or in vitro fertilization. 

If two women were to have sex together can one of them have a baby if one of them stuck their finger up the other ones vagina? or does one of them have to get sperm in order to do that?

Pregnancy can only occur when sperm meets an egg — so penetration with fingers alone, no matter what the gender of the people involved — won’t result in pregnancy.

However, there are lots of *methods* of joining sperm and egg in order to become pregnant, including intercourse, artificial insemination (sometimes called alternative fertilization), and in vitro fertilization– so you’re right to recognize that all kinds of couples can have babies.

I’m a transvestite who wants to go on the female pill. I’ve heard they will help me grow boobs. Is this true?

If you think are a transgender teen you might want to start by connecting with a good support person/network. Do you have a trusted adult you can talk with about your gender identity? If not, is there a local LGBTQ youth group in your area? A really good place to start is Maine TransNet, which offers information on local support groups and other resources; they can even connect you with a counselor who you can talk with.

If a person wants to take a hormonal medication–to transition, for birth control, or for any other reason–they MUST see a medical provider to make sure that they are taking the right medications in the right dose, because hormones can have serious risks and side effects.

Over time, there’s a chance that taking a very low dose of estrogen, as found in birth control, could lead to some weight gain around the hips and breasts, but while your body is still producing androgen and testosterone (“male” hormones) naturally, the amount of estrogen found in these pills may not result in any changes at all. Most people who take hormones in order to transition also take medications to block the hormones (testosterone) that their bodies are already making. Again, it is very important to talk with a medical provider before taking any medications, because taking the wrong kind of hormone(s) in the wrong amount could lead to serious risks without any of the intended benefits.

Hormonal medications can be complicated and definitely come with risks. The best thing to do is to talk with a health care provider– a provider at Maine Family Planning or a counselor at Maine TransNet could help answer your questions.

Why are people attracted to the same sex? I have nothing against it because it is free will of being you and you were just born to like the same sex, but why?

No one really knows why some people are gay, straight, or bisexual.

We do know that sexual orientation, attraction, and romantic feelings towards other people have to do with much more than body parts, and isn’t even all about sex or intercourse. Some people know from a very early age whether they are gay, straight, or bisexual, and other people need more time to figure things out. There is no right or wrong sexual orientation, and people of any orientation deserve healthy, safe, and loving relationships.

If two girls have oral sex like say with just tongues and don’t cum or anything can they still get an STD or HIV?

Yes. All STDs, including HIV, can be passed from one person to another through oral sex, no matter their gender or whether or not they have an orgasm (cum). Some STDs are particularly easy to pass through oral sex, including herpes and HPV.

To prevent transmission of any infections, use a dental dam during oral sex (or make a dental dam out of a condom). The video on this page will show you how.

what services for men are offered at family planning?

Most men who come to Family Planning come to us for testing and/or treatment for Sexually Transmitted Diseases or Infections (STDs/ STIs). They may decide to come to us because they have some symptoms that are bothering them (such as pain with urination, sores or rashes, or discharge from the penis), or because a partner tested positive for an STD and they want to make sure to be tested and treated, as well. Some men just make a point of coming to us once a year or whenever they have a new partner, just to be sure to be up to date with testing.

Men also come to Family Planning offices to pick up condoms and lube—no appointment needed! In fact, anyone can drop in to pick up condoms, lube, or emergency contraception (EC) without an appointment, no matter what their gender.

Men can also come in to talk with us about their plans for having (or not having) children in the future—we call this kind of visit “reproductive life planning,” and it’s just as important for men to think through their plans for preventing and/or planning children as it is for women.

Finally, we provide the full range of reproductive health services for transgender men. Trans men are people who were born with female body parts but have transitioned their gender so that they identify and live as men. Some trans men still have breasts, and many trans men have a cervix, uterus, and/or ovaries, so they still need breast exams, pelvic exams, pap smears, and/or birth control.

Family Planning providers are experts at reproductive health care for people of any gender—if you have questions about whether we provide the services you or someone you know is looking for, call your local clinic and ask.

What is my sexualities if I am emotionally and sexually attracted to my partner(of the same sex) but only her, no one else? Basically if you are attracted to one person only. Thank you 🙂

We’re not sure if there’s a word or sexual orientation that describes being attracted to only one person—but one of the great things about your own sexual orientation and your own identity is that YOU get to choose what word works best for you!

Sexual orientation is complex and not necessarily black and white. Some people know from an early age that they are gay, straight, or bisexual. Others learn about their orientation over time, and still other find that their identity changes over time. The important thing is that you stay true to your feelings and don’t pressure yourself to fit into a certain orientation or identity. Be patient and accept yourself no matter how you identify.

What happens when a guy takes hormonal pill and what is the most effective hormonal pill?

Seems like there are two questions here.

The first is what happens if a guy takes a hormonal pill– we’re assuming you mean a hormonal birth control pill.

Over time (if pills are taken regularly), there’s a chance that taking a super low dose of estrogen, as found in birth control, could lead to some weight gain around the hips and chest, but while a guy is still producing testosterone naturally, pills may not result in any changes at all.

However, if a person wants to take a hormonal medication– for birth control, because they are interested in transitioning genders, or for any other reason–they MUST see a medical provider to make sure that they are taking the right medications in the right dose, because hormones can have serious risks and side effects.

Your second question is what is the most effective hormonal pill– we’re not sure what kind of effectiveness you’re asking about, but we usually talk about effectiveness in terms of preventing pregnancy. Different pills will work differently for different bodies, and because birth control pills require a prescription, the best way for a person to know what will work best is to meet with a health care provider.

If you are talking about effectiveness for a different reason (like transitioning genders), birth control pills would NOT be effective. Our providers at Lewiston Family Planning could answer questions about hormone therapy for transitioning.

Hormonal medications can be complicated and do come with risks. The best thing to do is to talk with a health care provider– a provider at Maine Family Planning could help answer your questions.

What pills can I take to transition to a female?

Fortunately, there are safe, effective medications that transgender people can take in order to medically transition. Some trans* people decide to transition using hormones so that their appearance will more closely match their gender identity. These medicines usually include a combination of hormones and hormone blockers (which are needed to block some amount of the hormone your body already makes– otherwise, the hormones themselves won’t do much to help with transitioning).

Transitioning from one gender to another—whether medically, socially, or otherwise—is a complicated process. Every person’s body and naturally-occurring hormone levels are different, so it’s very important that anyone who wants to take hormones see a health provider for transition-related care. A health care provider can help figure out which hormones you’ll need, how much you’ll need, and can help you adjust levels depending on your body’s reactions.

Hormonal medications always have risks– even hormonal birth control has risks. That’s why it’s so important that you work with a physician to make sure you find the right balance for you. If you’re 18 or older, you can make an appointment to discuss hormonal transition at Lewiston Family Planning. If you’re under 18 or still need more info, Maine TransNet a good place to start.

How long would it take a guy that taking birth control pill to start change to a girl and start getting breasts?

If a person wants to take a hormonal medication–to transition, for birth control, or for any other reason–they MUST see a medical provider to make sure that they are taking the right medications in the right dose, because hormones can have serious risks and side effects.

Over time, there’s a chance that taking a very low dose of estrogen, as found in birth control, could lead to some weight gain around the hips and breasts, but while your body is still producing androgen and testosterone (“male” hormones) naturally, the amount of estrogen found in these pills probably wouldn’t result in any changes at all. Most people who take hormones in order to transition also take medications to block the hormones (testosterone) that their bodies are already making. Again, it is very important to talk with a medical provider before taking any medications, because taking the wrong kind of hormone(s) in the wrong amount could lead to serious risks without any of the benefits.

If you think are a transgender teen, we recommend that you connect with a good support person/network. Do you have a trusted adult you can talk with about your gender identity? If not, is there a local LGBTQ youth group in your area? A really good place to start is Maine TransNet, which offers information on local support groups and other resources; they can even connect you with a counselor who you can talk with.

Hormonal medications can be complicated and definitely come with risks. The best thing to do is to talk with a health care provider– for those 18 and over, Lewiston Family Planning does offer hormonal transition therapy.

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